Lemon Truffle Pie

This pie has all the ele­ments that I love in a dessert. First of all, lemon, which might just beat out choco­late for me if I really have to choose. A  lovely, creamy layer, (with lemon–even bet­ter!), and real whipped cream to top it all off!

You’ll have to blind-bake a 9 inch deep dish pie crust before you start. You can learn how with the Pie Crust Tuto­r­ial. You’ll need a deep-dish pie pan to accom­mo­date all the lemon lusciousness.

 1 (9 inch) pre-baked deep dish pie crust

6 oz. white chocolate

8 oz. cream cheese–softened

1 1/2 cups heavy cream–whipped and very lightly sweet­ened (should equal about 3 cups whipped cream)

3 cups lemon curd:

8 large egg yolks

2 table­spoons mod­i­fied food starch such as Thick Gel or Clear Gel

1 1/2 cups gran­u­lated sugar

1 1/2 cups water

1/2 cup fresh lemon juice  (microwave 2–3 large lemons for 30 sec­onds each–you’ll get a lot more juice from each lemon)

zest from 2–3 lemons

4 table­spoons butter

In a non-aliminum, non-reactive pan, blend the egg yolks with the Thick Gel and gran­u­lated sugar. Place over low heat and slowly whisk in the water and lemon juice.

On medium heat, stir mix­ture con­stantly until it barely begins to boil. Let boil for 1 minute, stir­ring well to keep the bot­tom from scorching.

Remove the pan from the heat and add the lemon zest and but­ter. Stir well. Strain through a seive if needed to remove any bits of cooked egg.

Put all but 1 cup of the curd into a bowl and cover with plas­tic wrap. Push the plas­tic wrap down onto the sur­face of the curd to pre­vent a skin from form­ing. Place into fridge until needed.

 Take the reserved 1 cup of lemon curd in it’s orig­i­nal pan and add the white choco­late. Set on stove on medium-low and stir until the choco­late is com­pletely melted and mix­ture is smooth. Set aside and let cool to room temperature.

Whip 1/2 cup of the heavy cream and set aside. Save the remain­ing 1 cup cream for the topping.

Beat the soft­ened cream cheese in a stand mixer until fluffy. Add the cooled lemon curd/chocolate mix­ture and con­tinue mix­ing until well incor­po­rated. Slowly fold in the reserved 1 cup whip­ping cream until well incorporated.

Spread this mix­ture into the bot­tom of the pre­pared 9 inch, deep-dish pie crust. Even out the top.

Add the remain­ing 2 cups lemon curd and spread out evenly.

Let set at least three hours in the refrig­er­a­tor with plas­tic wrap set onto the sur­face to keep a skin from form­ing on the curd.

Just before serv­ing, whip the remain­ing 1 cup heavy cream and top the pie. The pie in these pho­tos was topped with a thin layer of whipped cream, and then dec­o­rated with cream using a dec­o­ra­tors bag and a 2D tip. Start with a cen­ter swirl, and then fill in around it with more swirls out to the edge.

Lemon Truf­fle Pie

Ingre­di­ents

  • 1 (9 inch) pre-baked deep dish pie crust
  • 6 oz. white chocolate
  • 8 oz. cream cheese–softened
  • 1 1/2 cups heavy cream–whipped and very lightly sweet­ened (should equal about 3 cups whipped cream)
  • 3 cups lemon curd:
  • 8 large egg yolks
  • 2 table­spoons mod­i­fied food starch such as Thick Gel or Clear Gel
  • 1 1/2 cups gran­u­lated sugar
  • 1 1/2 cups water
  • 1/2 cup fresh lemon juice (microwave 2–3 large lemons for 30 sec­onds each–you’ll get a lot more juice from each lemon)
  • zest from 2–3 lemons
  • 4 table­spoons butter

Instruc­tions

  1. In a non-aliminum, non-reactive pan, blend the egg yolks with the Thick Gel and gran­u­lated sugar. Place over low heat and slowly whisk in the water and lemon juice.
  2. On medium heat, stir mix­ture con­stantly until it barely begins to boil. Let boil for 1 minute, stir­ring well to keep the bot­tom from scorching.
  3. Remove the pan from the heat and add the lemon zest and but­ter. Stir well. Run curd through a seive if needed to remove any bits of cooked eggs.
  4. Put all but 1 cup of the curd into a bowl and cover with plas­tic wrap. Push the plas­tic wrap down onto the sur­face of the curd to pre­vent a skin from form­ing. Place into fridge until needed.
  5. Take the reserved 1 cup of lemon curd in it’s orig­i­nal pan and add the white choco­late. Set on stove on medium-low and stir until the choco­late is com­pletely melted and mix­ture is smooth. Set aside and let cool to room temperature.
  6. Whip 1/2 cup of the heavy cream and set aside. Save the remain­ing 1 cup cream for the topping.
  7. Beat the soft­ened cream cheese in a stand mixer until fluffy. Add the cooled lemon curd/chocolate mix­ture and con­tinue mix­ing until well incor­po­rated. Slowly fold in the reserved 1 cup whip­ping cream until well incorporated.
  8. Spread this mix­ture into the bot­tom of the pre­pared 9 inch, deep-dish pie crust. Even out the top.
  9. Add the remain­ing 2 cups lemon curd and spread out evenly.
  10. Let set at least three hours in the refrig­er­a­tor with plas­tic wrap set onto the sur­face to keep a skin from form­ing on the curd.
  11. Just before serv­ing, whip the remain­ing 1 cup heavy cream and top the pie. The pie in these pho­tos was topped with a thin layer of whipped cream, and then dec­o­rated with cream using a dec­o­ra­tors bag and a 2D tip. Start with a cen­ter swirl, and then fill in around it with more swirls out to the edge.
http://secretlifeofachefswife.com/anthologie/desserts/lemon-truffle-pie

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16 Comments

  1. Such a beau­ti­ful pie! I love the design on top :). It looks so deli­cious and fresh; a great change from the heav­ier pies on Thanksgiving!

  2. it’s like… you read my mind.

  3. Oh my good­ness, that looks SO tasty! My mouth is water­ing just think­ing about the lemony good­ness. And it’s so pretty!

  4. More than the taste, your pie looks so pretty too. Which is I must say added plus points to your dessert because the eyes can judge faster than the tongue can. I know I won’t be dis­ap­pointed in the taste depart­ment, just read­ing out the pro­ce­dures makes me so excited. Will try this lemon truf­fle pie. Thanks for the post!

  5. OK, so I just thought the Pom. Pie was the one I needed. Please oh please, for the love of all things holy, save me a piece the next time you make this pie. I’ll be will­ing to trade a num­ber of ser­vices. (Though, I won’t men­tion them here, see­ing as this is a fam­ily friendly site.)

  6. I am so happy to have found this recipe! I love lemon, but I really do not enjoy lemon meringue pies. This will hap­pily take its place on our table! I am mak­ing it now!

  7. I’m mak­ing this for Christ­mas! My one aunt loves lemon pie, and I couldn’t resist an excuse to make lemon curd and mix it with choco­late! I thought you might want to know. Thanks for posting.

  8. Hi Tammy:

    Nisha again! I can’t find mod­i­fied food starch. Can I use corn starch in some way?

    Nisha

  9. Hi Tammy!

    I can’t find mod­i­fied food starch, can I use corn starch? And if so how much?

    Thanks,

    Nisha

    • Nisha–

      Corn­starch can be used in place of mod­i­fied food starch. How much is a trick­ier ques­tion. I got bet­ter results with less Mod­i­fied food starch, so I would guess that you would need a bit more corn­starch. For me, I would err on the side of run­nier because I don’t like the con­sis­tency corn­starch gives when too much is used. Maybe try 2 table­spoons plus 2 tea­spoons corn­starch to begin.

      Hope this helps!

  10. That looks amaz­ing, gotta try it!

    • Let us know how it works for you. It’s one of my very favorites!

  11. I made this over a year ago for the first time, and it is now a favorite of the entire fam­ily and every guest we serve it to. I’m so happy to have an alter­na­tive to lemon meringue! Thanks for this recipe! I’m mak­ing it again this week!

    • Yay! I am so happy you loved it. It’s a fam­ily favorite of our also!

      • Hmm…now that I think of it (and I do often — it’s THAT good!)…it wasn’t over a year at all. I guess it feels like we’ve been friends with this pie for much, much longer. ;)

  12. Love.Love.Love! this recipe. Even more than my ol’ stan­dard lemon bars. Btw, I’ve done my research on Instant Clear­Jel. This is well worth pur­chas­ing for sauces/fillings that are cooked or uncooked, and then chilled or frozen. (Plain corn­starch doesn’t han­dle this as well) In fact, it’s pre­ferred over pectin for mak­ing that Potawatomi Plum jelly, as it thick­ens –ahem– almost instantly, costs less and requires up to 70% less sugar. ;)

    p.s. I don’t “blame” you for treat­ing us to the Potawatomi Plum sor­bet instead…that color is just so blushing-luscious that I can’t stop look­ing at it. I have already shown my clos­est friends your photo and they can’t get enough of it either!

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